Football

Ohio Stadium Construction Update

Ohio State football Ohio Stadium Horseshoe Construction Renovation

The 2018 Ohio State Buckeyes will kick off their season against the Oregon State Beavers in 80 days, and their home stadium will be ready when they do.

The Ohio Stadium construction project is on schedule despite a rainier than average year and should not impact this fall’s football games, according to an Ohio State spokesman.

Crews are working all around the historic stadium as part of a multi-year renovation project that began in 2017.

This summer, the work is mainly happening on the west side of the stadium.

Crews removed 2,600 seats in the northwest corner of B Deck. That will drop the capacity of the stadium for the 2018 season and beyond.

That means the current record crowd at the Horseshoe, 110,045 for the 2016 Michigan game, may never be broken.

Ohio State football Ohio Stadium Horseshoe Construction Renovation
B Deck seats being replaced with suites

Those old sections of B Deck will be replace with new suites and loges in time for the 2019 season.

The project will add a total of 35 loge boxes and 12 luxury suites in that northwestern corner.

The rest of B Deck is getting a facelift as well. When the project is completed, it will have upgraded lighting, larger televisions, better scoreboards, and and an improved sound system.

Ohio State football Ohio Stadium Horseshoe Construction Renovation
The west side of C Deck in June 2018.

All of the bench seating on the west side of C Deck is also gone at the moment. Workers are restoring and recoating all of the 94-year-old concrete in that area to keep it in good shape. Those seats will be back in time for football season.

The east side of C Deck was done during the spring and summer of 2017. The final sections at the north end of the stadium will be repaired next year.

According to an Ohio State spokesman, “The suites and loges and the final phase of C Deck concrete restoration will be completed in August 2019.”

Ohio Stadium opened in 1922, and has undergone several renovations in the decades since.

The biggest project cost $194 million and was completed in 2001.

That took three years and added more than 10,000 seats to the stadium. It lowered the level of the field, and added new rows close to the playing surface. It also added new rows to the top of C Deck, and made the South Stands permanent.

You can see a full panoramic view of the construction as it appeared in June 2018 below.

Ohio State football Buckeyes Ohio Stadium Horseshoe

 

 

6 Responses

  1. Emotional class warfare conspiracy theories aside, the seats being permanently removed were “obstructed view” seats that people have complained about for as long as I can remember. I attended every home game for years until recently, and the empty seats in that area were very noticeable even during “sold out” games. Anyone unlucky enough to get those seats generally found someplace else from which to watch the game soon after kickoff, if not before.

    1. Yeah, it is only class warfare when we fight back.

  2. They removed seats to cater to the wealth? Fuck that shit.

  3. so….taking out seats for the common folk and adding more for the richie rich…i don’t like LOSING seats..bad move.

  4. Upgraded sound system? Oh brother! Football games are going to sound like a bad wedding DJ now. I’ve been in Michigan Stadium, and it’s like being at a “and 1” basketball game. Chintzy rap music being blasted with waayyyyy too much bass. Said the old guy, I know, I’m old… but trust me, they didn’t upgrade the sound system to make the announcements more intelligible. More bass. More noise. And the sound engineers’ average age will be about 24, BANK on it.

    Now I’ve got my grump on for the rest of the day!!! 🙂

    1. can’t disagree with any of your observations–don’t need cheesy cheers and announcements. to pump up the game. The football game, pagentry and setting are quite enough…less is more! Take a look at any rank and file NBA game to see where noise gone wild can lead you…

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